New administration removes SSDI rule from consideration

New administration removes SSDI rule from consideration

| Feb 17, 2021 | Social Security Disability |

A few weeks ago, the Biden administration withdrew a proposal from the previous administration that was set to increase the number of eligibility reviews for disability insurance. The proposal would have added an additional layer of screening in determining who was eligible for insurance.

When the proposed rule was first published in the Federal Register on November 2019, it became the subject of criticism from advocacy groups. After the rule’s removal, those same advocacy groups pushed for additional changes to be made within the Social Security Administration.

The advocacy groups are now asking for the removal of the current Social Security Administration Commissioner and his Deputy Commissioner. The advocacy groups want the commissioners’ removal because they are appointees held over from the previous administration. As evidenced by this recent news, Social Security Disability Insurance can be the focus of aggressive policy battles.

Navigating changes in the SSDI process

Executive orders, administration transfers and personnel changes can all affect the Social Security Disability Insurance process. It is important to stay up-to-date and work with an experienced professional who stays current with the law and is ready to fight for much needed funds.

Even when the process seems easy – and the Social Security Administration details all of the information necessary to apply – an applicant can still get rejected. Sometimes, the SSA makes a mistake in their evaluation process, misreading or discounting the applicant’s crucial medical evidence.

Why seek help?

Discerning where the SSA decision makers made a mistake in their own process is an arduous task for a new applicant. A professional with experience is intimately familiar with the SSDI application and appeals processes and can help submit the strongest possible case to help obtain much needed financial assistance.

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